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New conveyor belt cleaner design reduces inventory

A new conveyor belt cleaner has been designed with an innovative method of holding the urethane blade in place without the need to mill any slots for holding pins.

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New conveyor belt cleaner design reduces inventory

Combining the benefits of previous designs into one product, Martin Engineering said that its QC1+ Belt Cleaner can be cut to length to fit virtually any application, reducing the need for customers to stock multiple blade sizes to accommodate different belt widths.

 

Operators simply trim the blade to the desired size from the stock 9ft (2.74m) length to match the material path, slide in the blade holders and lock them in position. The new blade can be retrofitted to virtually any Martin main frame and most competing designs.

 

“In most belt cleaner designs, the blade is pinned in place, but this new approach uses a hole right in the aluminium extrusion to keep the blade firmly in position,” explained Dave Mueller, conveyor products manager.

 

“The biggest benefit to customers is the ability to buy long length blades and cut them to size without doing any machining. Most customers have a number of different belt widths, so in the past they’ve had to stock different blade sizes. But this design can accommodate a wide range of belts with a single product.”

 

In some applications, existing cleaner designs are limited by the placement of the pin holes. In the case of a 36-inch (91.4cm) wide belt that has a material path of just 20-inch (51cm), for example, there might be pin holes at 2-inch (5cm), 6-inch (15cm) and 8-inch (20.3cm), with no holes for a 20-inch blade. The result would be the dreaded ‘smiley face’ wear pattern, and the uneven blade wear shortened its service life.

 

“With this design, the blade holders slide and lock on a blade guide rail, and are adjustable to whatever width is needed to match the material path,” said Mueller. “That contributes to better cleaning efficiency and longer blade life.”

 

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